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sixpenceee:

Krista and Tatiana Hogan are craniopagus twins, meaning they’re connected at the head.

They share a structure that connects Krista’s thalamus to Tatiana’s. The thalamus is a double-lobed organ that plays important roles in processing sensory input and creating consciousness.

Since Krista’s and Tatiana’s thalami are connected, scientists and members of the Hogan family think the girls might view the world differently than the rest of us do.

For example, Dr. Cochrane believes the girls can see through each other’s eyes. He came to this conclusion after covering Krista’s eyes, placing electrodes on her head, and watched Krista’s brain respond after shining a light in Tatiana’s pupils.

Other times, one girl will be watching TV while the other is looking somewhere else. Suddenly, the twin not watching TV will start laughing at what’s happening onscreen.

Their “thalamic bridge” also affects their sense of taste. Krista is a ketchup fiend, but Tatiana hates the stuff. Once, Krista was eating ketchup, and Tatiana furiously tried to wipe it off her own tongue even though she wasn’t eating any ketchup herself.

Perhaps the strangest phenomenon of all is that the twins sometimes use the word “I” to describe both of themselves at once.

As of 2011, no one had run any conclusive tests on the girls and their odd condition. However, scientists who have observed their behavior and brain scans are flabbergasted and excited. While no one can say for sure at the moment, it really does seem Krista and Tatiana can share private thoughts and perceive what the other is sensing.

As someone who wants to study consciousness in the future, I can say this is one of the most extraordinary cases I have ever heard of. 

SOURCE

MORE WOW SCIENCE

(via frenchhornsandunicorns)

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forgetpolitics:

For anyone who only sees gender and sex in black and white, here’s proof by the lovely humon that nature is just as fluid with representations of gender and sex as we are.

(via calebdenecutie)

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ilovecharts:

“Categorization of baked goods (and pancakes) in English and Chinese” - from my blog ‘haonowshaokao’
-James

ilovecharts:

“Categorization of baked goods (and pancakes) in English and Chinese” - from my blog ‘haonowshaokao’

-James

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did-you-kno:


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fattiesinlove:

repede:

cakemeister:

Today in Useful Fucking Things That No One Tells You About: the Prescription Assistance Program (PAP) offers a discount drug card to uninsured Americans. The card is accepted at over 56,000 pharmacies nationwide, including CVS, RiteAid, Walgreens, and Safeway, and offers a discount of up to 75%.

I was fired a few years ago and was afraid I would have to give up my antidepressants, but my dad told me about the drug card. With it, I paid $30 instead of $60. Still kinda pricey, but I was able to afford them until I found a new job (and since they were for my social anxiety, I have no doubt they helped during interviews).

Share this. I’m sure there are a ton of unemployed and uninsured people who don’t know about this.

So important, definitely spread this.

That one time I wasn’t on psych meds because I couldn’t afford them.

LIFE SAVING INFORMATION, PEOPLE

This is awesome to know about, so I needed to share this!

(Source: filthycannibal, via persephonebalthazar)

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sirthomasoftardis:

With the entire universe being so large, our brains can comprehend a good amount of it.
“We’re made of star stuff.  We are a way for the cosmos to know itself.” - Carl Sagan

sirthomasoftardis:

With the entire universe being so large, our brains can comprehend a good amount of it.

“We’re made of star stuff.  We are a way for the cosmos to know itself.” - Carl Sagan

(Source: , via pastellieria)

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alchymista:

How Long-Running is the Longest Running Lab Experiment?
Eighty-five years so far. The pitch-drop experiment—really more of a demonstration—began in 1927 when Thomas Parnell, a physics professor at the University of Queensland in Australia, set out to show his students that tar pitch, a derivative of coal so brittle that it can be smashed to pieces with a hammer, is in fact a highly viscous fluid. It flows at room temperature, albeit extremely slowly. Parnell melted the pitch, poured it into a glass funnel, let it cool (for three years), hung the funnel over a beaker, and waited.
Eight years later, a dollop of the pitch fell from the funnel’s stem. Nine years after that, another long black glob broke into the beaker. Parnell recorded the second drop but did not live to see the third, in 1954. By then, his experiment had been squirreled away in a dusty corner of the physics department.
Today the experiment is broadcast on a live webcam. Some of its fans send Mainstone e-mails within minutes if the screen goes black. Despite their efforts, on November 28, 2000, the eighth, and most recent, drop of pitch fell during a camera malfunction. To this day, no one has actually witnessed the moment a drop of pitch has detached and fallen.
Mainstone says it’s impossible to predict when future drops will occur, especially because the lapses between will grow longer as gases in the pitch escape and the weight of the pitch in the funnel decreases. He expects, however, that the ninth drop won’t break off before 2013. The experiment is far from complete. Says Mainstone, “It has at least 100 years left if someone doesn’t throw it out.”

alchymista:

How Long-Running is the Longest Running Lab Experiment?

Eighty-five years so far. The pitch-drop experiment—really more of a demonstration—began in 1927 when Thomas Parnell, a physics professor at the University of Queensland in Australia, set out to show his students that tar pitch, a derivative of coal so brittle that it can be smashed to pieces with a hammer, is in fact a highly viscous fluid. It flows at room temperature, albeit extremely slowly. Parnell melted the pitch, poured it into a glass funnel, let it cool (for three years), hung the funnel over a beaker, and waited.

Eight years later, a dollop of the pitch fell from the funnel’s stem. Nine years after that, another long black glob broke into the beaker. Parnell recorded the second drop but did not live to see the third, in 1954. By then, his experiment had been squirreled away in a dusty corner of the physics department.

Today the experiment is broadcast on a live webcam. Some of its fans send Mainstone e-mails within minutes if the screen goes black. Despite their efforts, on November 28, 2000, the eighth, and most recent, drop of pitch fell during a camera malfunction. To this day, no one has actually witnessed the moment a drop of pitch has detached and fallen.

Mainstone says it’s impossible to predict when future drops will occur, especially because the lapses between will grow longer as gases in the pitch escape and the weight of the pitch in the funnel decreases. He expects, however, that the ninth drop won’t break off before 2013. The experiment is far from complete. Says Mainstone, “It has at least 100 years left if someone doesn’t throw it out.”

(via pastellieria)

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theshoutingendoflife:

ruddystargazers:

:O brilliant. good. yes.

This is pretty much the greatest work of engineering since space travel.

Love it!!

(Source: humorspot, via eddplant-deactivated20130821)

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did-you-kno:

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did-you-kno:

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Evil Kimono dress that killed 100,000 people

did-you-kno:

A kimono owned by three teenage girls, each of whom died before having a chance to wear it, was considered so unlucky that it was burned by a priest in 1657. But as the garment burned, a wind fanned the flames and started a fire that destroyed 75% of Tokyo killing 100,000 people.

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Can this be a Doctor Who storyline? I’d love to see how that would work…

(via did-you-kno)

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theweekmagazine:

The Exclamation Comma. “Just because you’re excited about something doesn’t mean you have to end the sentence.”
That’s true.
14 Punctuation Marks You Never Knew Existed

theweekmagazine:

The Exclamation Comma. “Just because you’re excited about something doesn’t mean you have to end the sentence.”

That’s true.

14 Punctuation Marks You Never Knew Existed

(Source: theweek.com, via madelinestarr)

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There was a man named David who was his own grandfather.

did-you-kno:

There was a widow [Anne] and her daughter [Jane], and a man [George] and his son [Henry]. The widow married the son, and the daughter married the father. The widow was therefore mother [in law] to her husband’s father, and grandmother to her own husband. By this husband she had a son [David], to whom she was also great-grandmother. Now, the son of a great-grandmother must be grandfather or grand-uncle to the person to whom his mother was great-grandmother; but Anne was great-grandmother to him [David]. Therefore David is his own grandfather.

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My mother does genealogy, so this shouldn’t blow my mind as badly as it does…

(via did-you-kno)