Quote
"

We were grabbing a bite of lunch at a small cafe, in a mall, right across from a booth that sold jewelry and where ears could be pierced for a fee. A mother approaches with a little girl of six or seven years old. The little girl is clearly stating that she doesn’t want her ears pierced, that’s she’s afraid of how much it will hurt, that she doesn’t like earrings much in the first place. Her protests, her clear ‘no’ is simply not heard. The mother and two other women, who work the booth, begin chatting and trying to engage the little girl in picking out a pair of earrings. She has to wear a particular kind when the piercing is first done but she could pick out a fun pair for later.

"I don’t want my ears pierced."

"I don’t want any earrings."

The three adults glance at each other conspiratorially and now the pressure really begins. She will look so nice, all the other girls she knows wear earrings, the pain isn’t bad.

She, the child, sees what’s coming and starts crying. As the adults up the volume so does she, she’s crying and emitting a low wail at the same time. “I DON’T WANT MY EARS PIERCED.”

Her mother leans down and speaks to her, quietly but strongly, the only words we could hear were ‘… embarrassing me.’

We heard, then, two small screams, when the ears were pierced.

Little children learn early and often that ‘no doesn’t mean no.’

Little children learn early that no one will stand with them, even the two old men looking horrified at the events from the cafeteria.

Little girls learn early and often that their will is not their own.

No means no, yeah, right.

Most often, for kids and others without power, ”no means force.”

"

from "No Means Force" at Dave Hingsburger’s blog.

This is important. It doesn’t just apply to little girls and other children, though it often begins there.

For the marginalized, our “no’s” are discounted as frivolous protests, rebelliousness, or anger issues, or we don’t know what we’re talking about, or we don’t understand what’s happening.

When “no means force” we become afraid to say no.

(via k-pagination)

(via taeguktotadasana)

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Tags: Doctor Who
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pondragon:

Deep Breath + shushing

(via iodineoxygenuraniumafall)

Tags: Doctor Who
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justyouraveragehaggis:

beckyhop:

zftw:

we need to talk about that house loan

It’s gonna cost you a leg. Specifically, that guy’s prosthetic leg.
I need it.

I also need that guy’s eye.

justyouraveragehaggis:

beckyhop:

zftw:

we need to talk about that house loan

It’s gonna cost you a leg. Specifically, that guy’s prosthetic leg.

I need it.

I also need that guy’s eye.

(Source: awwww-cute, via faethena)

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crunchbuttsteak:

have you ever known somebody so shitty they completely ruin that first name for you?

(via brigwife)

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4gifs:

That dance tho. [video]

4gifs:

That dance tho. [video]

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

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gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

(via claracupcakes)

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alphasapphire:

Parks and Recreation Season 6 Gag Reel [x]

(via wasarahbi)

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Sarah playing with Chuck’s ties

(Source: chuckvsthegifs, via lucylivesherlife)

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my-wanton-self:

It must be such a satisfying feeling to design one of these and have them work exactly as you’d envisaged.

(Source: zerostatereflex, via imjustwaiting)

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I didn’t think I’d enjoy this, but I did. I love learning new things about myself. :)

(Source: dumpmeinthebayou, via drunkkitchens)

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castielisactuallyagirlsname:

97% sure that the doctor and clara are essentially teenage girls when they see a hot guy in public

image

image

(via thegirlbehindthegasmask)

Tags: Doctor Who
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kalynnemarie:

DAD NO

kalynnemarie:

DAD NO

(via gnarly)

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dekutree:

waxed-pubes:

dekutree:

easy
Pokemon Red
Pokemon Blue
Pokemon Gold
Pokemon Silver
Pokemon Bronze
Pokemon Red Fire
Pokemon Grass Green
Pokemon Ruby Tuesday
Pokemon Safe Fire
Pokemon A B C
Pokemon X Y Z
Pokemon Now I know my A B C’s
Pokemon Dungeon Dice Monsters
Pokemon The Last Airbender
Pokemon of the Galaxy
Pokemon Horror Story: Asylum
Pokemon Horror Story: Coven
Pokemon Horror Story: ….Coven 2
Pokemon Ping Pong
Pokemon Party 
Pokemon Party 8
PokeKart: Double Dash
Pokemon Crunch Wrap Supreme 
Pokemon Cross Dress
Pokemon Fingerblast
Pokemon Facebook Edition
Pokemon Who?
Castlevania 2: Simon’s Quest

LEAFGREEN not Grass Green

yes thank you. THAT’S the one game i needed to be corrected on.

dekutree:

waxed-pubes:

dekutree:

easy

  1. Pokemon Red
  2. Pokemon Blue
  3. Pokemon Gold
  4. Pokemon Silver
  5. Pokemon Bronze
  6. Pokemon Red Fire
  7. Pokemon Grass Green
  8. Pokemon Ruby Tuesday
  9. Pokemon Safe Fire
  10. Pokemon A B C
  11. Pokemon X Y Z
  12. Pokemon Now I know my A B C’s
  13. Pokemon Dungeon Dice Monsters
  14. Pokemon The Last Airbender
  15. Pokemon of the Galaxy
  16. Pokemon Horror Story: Asylum
  17. Pokemon Horror Story: Coven
  18. Pokemon Horror Story: ….Coven 2
  19. Pokemon Ping Pong
  20. Pokemon Party 
  21. Pokemon Party 8
  22. PokeKart: Double Dash
  23. Pokemon Crunch Wrap Supreme 
  24. Pokemon Cross Dress
  25. Pokemon Fingerblast
  26. Pokemon Facebook Edition
  27. Pokemon Who?
  28. Castlevania 2: Simon’s Quest

LEAFGREEN not Grass Green

yes thank you. THAT’S the one game i needed to be corrected on.

(via persephonebalthazar)